Last edited by Dougis
Sunday, May 17, 2020 | History

2 edition of Working class feminism in Puerto Rico (1900-1920) found in the catalog.

Working class feminism in Puerto Rico (1900-1920)

Marcia Rivera Quintero

Working class feminism in Puerto Rico (1900-1920)

by Marcia Rivera Quintero

  • 357 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by Women"s International Resource Exchange Service in New York, N.Y .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Feminism -- Puerto Rico.,
  • Women -- Employment -- Puerto Rico -- History.,
  • Women -- Puerto Rico -- Social conditions.,
  • Working class women -- Puerto Rico.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Marcia Rivera Quintero.
    ContributionsWomen"s International Resource Exchange Service.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination8 p. ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL20341973M

      1. The advocacy of women's rights on the basis of the equality of the sexes. 2. The theory of the political, economic, and social equality of the sexes. 3. The belief that men and women should.   Sharon Smith, author of the soon-to-be-republished Women and Socialism: Essays on Women's Liberation, examines how the Marxist tradition has approached the struggle to end women's oppression.

    Feminists, socialists, Afro-Puerto Rican activists, and elite politicians join laundresses, prostitutes, and dissatisfied wives in populating the pages of Imposing h her analyses of Puerto Rican anti-prostitution campaigns, attempts at reforming marriage, and working-class ideas about free love, Eileen J. Suárez Findlay exposes the race-related double standards of . The Young Lords’ unrelenting calls for Puerto Rican independence, their various interventions in local politics, their unyielding solidarity with colonized and working-class people everywhere.

      I missed references to the role of the church throughout, a working definition of feminism, and a grounded discussion of class. The impact of Findlay's research on the historiography on Puerto Rico, however, is so overwhelmingly positive that . In this article, the author presents some of the counterpoints between historical developments and feminist studies in Puerto Rico since the s, elaborating on the most recurrent topics.


Share this book
You might also like
Wade cup in the Cleveland Museum of Art

Wade cup in the Cleveland Museum of Art

Supervisor, man and leader

Supervisor, man and leader

Effect of minor impurities on the electrical properties of Se and Se containing glasses

Effect of minor impurities on the electrical properties of Se and Se containing glasses

Family of Wesley D. McCann; Bourbon County, Kentucky: Adams County, Illinois.

Family of Wesley D. McCann; Bourbon County, Kentucky: Adams County, Illinois.

Seasonal changes in the intertidal and subtidal macrobenthic invertebrate community structure in Baker Bay, lower Columbia River estuary

Seasonal changes in the intertidal and subtidal macrobenthic invertebrate community structure in Baker Bay, lower Columbia River estuary

Saints of old

Saints of old

Geology of the western portion of the Arabian-Nubian Shield

Geology of the western portion of the Arabian-Nubian Shield

Buried Dreams

Buried Dreams

caution to gentlemen who use Sheridans Dictionary

caution to gentlemen who use Sheridans Dictionary

description and analysis of longitudinal records of development of elementary school children in Ferndale, Michigan

description and analysis of longitudinal records of development of elementary school children in Ferndale, Michigan

Autumn journey

Autumn journey

Aborigines and the law

Aborigines and the law

development of watermarking in hand-made and machine-made papers.

development of watermarking in hand-made and machine-made papers.

The last cat book

The last cat book

Working class feminism in Puerto Rico (1900-1920) by Marcia Rivera Quintero Download PDF EPUB FB2

Puerto Rico is one of the oldest colonies in the world. Perhaps because it has been through a history of colonialism, post-colonialism, and post-colonial colonialism, it makes for a fascinating story to tell and explore.

In proceeding with this research, I was interested in Puerto Rico’s unique status as a commonwealth and its quasi-colonial relations to the United States in a. Recovering the Latina Working Class Feminism. Das, Amrita // Confluencia;Fall, Vol. 26 Issue 1, p A review of the book "Absolute Equality: An Early Feminist Perspective," a translation of the book "Influencias de las ideas modernas" by Luisa Capetillo and translated by Lara Walker is presented.

Posts about feminism and class written by sirtutist. Luisa Capetillo, – Background. Luisa Capetillo was an author and activist who worked in.

While working as a reader, Capetillo also became a highly regarded innovator with the Free Federation of Workers, Puerto Rico’s most important labor organization between and. Working-class women might not be fighting for a cause with words, time and money they don’t have, but they possess an unsurpassed wisdom about the way gender works in the world.

Take, for Author: Sarah Smarsh. Individual essays include discussions of plantation justice in Guatemala, highland Indians in Nicaragua, the effects of foreign corporations in Costa Rica, coffee production in El Salvador, banana workers in Honduras, sexuality and working-class feminism in Puerto Rico, the Cuban sugar industry, agrarian reform in the Dominican Republic, and.

Feminism poses a big barrier to working-class women, but most feminists don't even realise it." year-old Rachel Owen grew up as one of five children on a housing estate in Blackeley, Manchester.

"Most women here won't go to feminism meetings, they're tired at the end of the day, and don't want to outdo each other with academic debate. Historical Perspectives on Feminism and the Puerto Rican Woman La Mujer en la Lucha Hoy, Nancy A.

Zayas and Juan Angel Silén, eds. (RÃ-o Piedras: Ediciones KikirikÃ- ). The Puerto Rican Woman: Perspectives on Culture, History, and Society, Edna Acosta-Belén, ed. (, 2nd edition, New York: Praeger, ).

University of Puerto Rico In this article, the author presents some of the counterpoints between historical developments and femi-nist studies in Puerto Rico since the s, elaborating on the most recurrent topics.

She includes a brief historical overview of Puerto Rico and the trends in women's status, feminism, and feminist studies in the. The recorded history of women in Puerto Rico can trace its roots back to the era of the Taíno, the indigenous people of the Caribbean, who inhabited the island that they called "Boriken" before the arrival of the Spanish colonization the cultures and customs of the Taíno, Spanish, African and women from non-Hispanic European countries blended into what.

Chapter 1 of the book "Luisa Capetillo: Pioneer Puerto Rican Feminist" is presented. It focuses on the origins of the feminist struggle in Puerto Rico. It discusses the status of the education of Puerto Rican women prior to the 19th century. It notes that schools for females were at a disadvantage compared with the schools for males.

Efrén Rivera Ramos, The Legal Construction of Identity: The Judicial and Social Legacy of American Colonialism in Puerto Rico (American Psychological Association, ).

César J. Ayala and Rafael Bernabe, Puerto Rico in the American Century: A History Since (UNC Press, ). Laura Briggs, Reproducing Empire: Race, Sex, Science, and U.S.

Imperialism in Puerto. History Background and origins. The first strike related to working conditions that is recorded took place at San Juan, then the capital of the Spanish colonial government, in Following the Spanish Republic and the abolition of slavery five years later, the economic changes pushed farmers to the urban centers of Puerto Rico creating a new working class composed by.

Puerto Rico is often depicted as a "racial democracy" in which a history of race mixture has produced a racially harmonious society.

In Remixing Reggaetón, Petra R. Rivera-Rideau shows how reggaetón musicians critique racial democracy's privileging of whiteness and concealment of racism by expressing identities that center blackness and African diasporic belonging.

Female employment and the social reproduction of the Puerto Rican working class. Safa HI. PIP: The rapid industrialization, migration and urbanization processes in Puerto Rico since have been responsible for the increase in the rate of female employment from % in to % inwhile the rate of male employment has by: A broad survey of topics on gender and the history of Puerto Rican women, both on the island and in the diaspora.

Organized chronologically and covering the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, essays deal with issues of slavery, emancipation, wage work, women and politics, women's suffrage, industrialization, migration, and Puerto Rican women in New York.

Second-wave feminism was a period of feminist activity and thought that began in the United States in the early s and lasted roughly two decades. It quickly spread across the Western world, with an aim to increase equality for women by gaining more than just enfranchisement.

Whereas first-wave feminism focused mainly on suffrage and overturning legal obstacles to. 16 The Emergence of Feminism in Puerto Rico, Yamila Azize-Vargas Without a doubt, the twentieth century can be named the Century of Feminism.

Economic, political, and social transformations interacted to significandy change women's status. Puerto Rico was no exception. Here I discuss the principal factors and events that were fundamental to improving women's.

InBernardo Vega boards a ship in San Juan, Puerto Rico to come to New York City — this journey, this life as a Puerto Rican in the pioneer phase of migration, where on average 2, Puerto Ricans were migrating to the continental U.S., is chronicled in the Memoirs of Bernardo Vega.

InEsmeralda Santiago published [ ]. The Puerto Rican woman: perspectives on culture, history, and society.

on women's organizations in Puerto Rico / Norma Valle Ferrer --Female employment and the social reproduction of the Puerto Rican working class / Helen I. Safa --The effects of role expectations on the marital status of urban # Feminism--Puerto Rico\/span>\n.

Women’s roles in Puerto Rico have followed the same pattern as many other women’s roles in different countries over several centuries. Puerto Rican women have been viewed as subservient to men for centuries, but as time; acculturation; education; and open labor markets have increased, Puerto Rican women have gained equal rights and are no longer viewed as only .When the hurricane hit I was working on a fourth Justice Hustlers book.

The fourth book was going to be about Lily, a West Indian stripper organizer who arrived undocumented. I was excited to pull in a bunch of different things, and then the hurricane hit. Like so many people in the Puerto Rican diaspora, I was trying to figure out what to do.Luisa Capetillo was an author and activist who worked in cigar factories in Puerto Rico, New York, and Florida.

Recap. In Mi opinión, Capetillo highlights the plight of working-class women who sacrifice family for work – because they need the money. She responds to a piece about “of high and well-off position” by arguing that white.